Trieste - Zurich - Paris
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Stadt Theatre Zürich Playbill, 1917–18
& Photograph of Nora Joyce, [1917]
~ Richard Ellmann Papers
(102K)

The playbill is for both the Stadt and Pfauen theatres. It is dated Monday, 17 June 1918, and the performance was scheduled to begin at  8 p.m.

Joyce’s interest in the theater, as well as in business, was renewed in Zürich in the spring of 1917 when he and Claud W. Sykes started The English Players, a troupe that would perform plays in English. While they tried to get Joyce’s Exiles preformed and hoped to profit from their productions, the two could not agree upon an actor suitable to play the character of Richard Rowen and Joyce’s financial management tended to be extravagant. Their first performance was of Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest at the Theater zu den Kaufleuten on 29 April 1917. A month and a half later, Nora Joyce first appeared as Cathleen in Synge’s drama set in the Aran Islands. Her accent was perfect for the role and her performance was well received. Also in the cast was Daisy Race, who was Sykes’s wife, Nora’s friend and a professional actress. Claud Sykes was also the first in a long succession of semi-professional typists Joyce relied upon to prepare Ulysses for the printer. Sykes typed the first three chapters in December 1917 and February 1918.
 

26 Verbannte, 1919 ~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection

JAMES JOYCE | VERBANNTE | Schauspiel in drei Akten | [double rule] | Racher & Cie., Verlag, Zürich, 1919
(41K)

Contents: p. [1], [publisher’s device]; p. [2], blank; p. [3], title-page; p. [4], Ins Deutsche übertragen von Hannah von Mettal | [copyright statement] | printer’s statement: Buchdruckerei von ASCHMANN & SCHELLER, ZÜRICH; p. [5], Personen [cast of characters]; p. [6], blank; pp. 7–153, text; p. [154], blank; p. [155], [publisher’s advertisement]; p. [156], [publisher’s device]. Published: March 1919; 600 copies; bound in green paper, 19 x 12.5 cm., printed in dark blue on front cover: JAMES JOYCE | VERBANNTE | Schauspiel | in | drei Akten | [double rule] | Racher & Cie., Verlag, Zürich, 1919, and on spine (from bottom to top): James Joyce/VERBANNTE , and on back cover: [publisher’s device]; printed on cream-white laid paper, untrimmed, unopened, 19.2 x 12.6 cm. 

Joyce began Exiles in the spring of 1914 and finished it in September of the next year while living in Zürich. Three years later, on 25 May 1918, B.W. Huebsch and Grant Richards published simultaneous editions in New York and London. Another year passed before Exiles was first performed in German translation as Verbannte on 7 August 1919 in Munich. Joyce was unable to obtain a German visa to see the performance and Ellmann records that when Joyce received the first word on the performance via telegram, it caused him to exclaim, “A fiasco!”11 Though the theater management wrote that the event had been a success, they withdrew the play immediately. Nonetheless, the performance received wide-spread attention in the German press where at least thirty reviews, of mixed opinion, appeared that year in the Münchner Neueste Nachrichten, the München-Augsburger Abendzeitung, the Berliner Tageblatt, the Vossische Zeitung, and the Neue Freie Presse, among others. Joyce signed and inscribed this copy of his only drama: “To | Harriet Weaver | on the day of its first | production –Schauspiel in Munich– in grateful | remembrance | James Joyce | Zurich: Switzerland | 7 August 1919.”
 

27 The Little Review, March & May 1918
~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection

The Little Review: Making No Compromise with Public Taste, New York (March 1914–May 1929). “Ulysses, I,” (March 1918) pp. 3–22; “Ulysses, III,” (May 1918) pp. 31–45. [Slocum & Cahoon C53]
(73K)

Twenty-three issues of The Little Review, vols. IV.4, IV.11 (incorrectly numbered V.11)–VIII.4; March 1918–January-March 1921, except for V.4, V.7–8, VI.1, VI.6 and VI.11 (only VI.1 and VI.11 contained portions of Ulysses). Only vols. [1]V.11, V.1, V.2 (incorrectly numbered VI.2) have any corrections, instructions or printers’ markings. Issues [1]V.11–VII.2 have the Ulysses chapter numbers I–XIIIc written in the top right corners of the front covers, possibly in Joyce’s hand, in blue crayon.

Textual collation: Confirming Hans Walter Gabler’s earlier speculation,12 The Egoist’s printers, The Complete Press, West Norwood, used copies of The Little Review (and not a copy of the typescript) as their setting text for the five installments of Ulysses–Nestor, Proteus, Hades, and the first third of Wandering Rocks–that appeared in The Egoist (vols. VI.1-5; January-February–December 1919). These documents were not reproduced in the James Joyce Archive.

These are the copies of The Little Review used to set up The Egoist’s installments of Ulysses, Harriet Shaw Weaver’s own copies of vols. [1]V.11 (March 1918) and V.1 (May 1918), with “Ulysses, I” and “Ulysses, III.” This set exhibits the scars of the “great fire” at Weaver’s flat in Gloucester Place, London on 30 May 1934 that destroyed many of her belongings and books.13 Weaver made numerous corrections in pencil to the text of Ulysses as published in America, presumably by consulting a copy of the typescript. She altered the very first line in The Little Review to read “Stately plump Buck Mulligan […]” rather than “Stately, plump Buck Mulligan […].” But The Egoist’s printers did not correct this error. Weaver also restored many of Joyce’s compound words, such as “lookingglass” and “lightshod,” which were hyphenated in The Little Review as well as “shavingbowl” that was printed as two words. In their attempt to conform to their own house style, rather than Joyce’s, the printers were inconsistent in their implementation of these and other emendations, not only retaining some of the hyphenated words but also adding unauthorized hyphens. Fortunately, they did correct several, more substantial errors, such as Joyce’s preferred spelling of “woful,” the misspelling of “Stepphen” on p. 17 and the characterization of Haines’s father as “rotto with money” (rather than The Little Review’s “rotton”). Fearing prosecution after they had set-up the text, The Egoist’s printer refused to print Telemachus–even with deletions.14 The Egoist published Nestor without any deletions, although the printers failed to follow earlier instructions concerning Joyce’s use of dashes to represent quotations. On the other hand, The Complete Press refused to set Proteus without deletions and their censorship is most evident on pp. 32–33 where the entire paragraph describing the midwives’ journey and Stephen’s thoughts about creation, that begins “They came down from Leahy’s Terrace […]” was blocked off with the instructions to “insert dots.” The text was set in The Egoist with ellipses. The printers also planned to censor Calypso, but ultimately refused to print it at all.

The censorship of Ulysses was something Joyce would have to face again when the January and May 1919 and the January and July-August 1920 issues of The Little Review were seized and its editors brought to trial for publishing obscenity.
 

28 Joyce to Mlle Linossier, 17 & 23 February 1921
 

Eight autograph letters from Joyce to Raymonde Linossier, dated 9, 13, 25 January & 12, 17, 19, 23 and 27 February 1921, in French, signed and unpublished. On display are the letters dated 17 & 23 February 1921.

 In January 1921, Joyce still maintained a glimmer of hope that Huebsch would publish an American edition of Ulysses, but the nightmare of getting this work into print was only just beginning. Joyce started the year by escaping from the chaotic world inhabited by Circe, or so he thought: he still had to find a suitable typist. As the newly uncovered manuscripts of Circe acquired by the National Library of Ireland show, Joyce’s claim that he had rewritten the chapter from first to last nine times may not be as far off the mark as has been thought. At this stage Joyce’s handwriting–and not the content of this chapter–was the principal obstacle. After several typists had turned down the work as impossible, Sylvia and Cyprian Beach began to transcribe his draft, but Joyce, as usual, further revised these “clean” copies. Fortunately for them, Mlle Linossier came to the rescue. Not only was she a daughter of a famous Parisian physician, she was a close friend of the composer Francis Poulenc and also the author of an odd work of poetry called Bibi-la-Bibiste, parts of which had just appeared in The Little Review VII.3 (September-December 1920). So that she would understand the work, Joyce gave her copies of chapters of Ulysses that had already appeared in The Little Review as well as review articles. Willing as she may have been, her father’s sudden heart attack compelled her to slow down the typing after she had only completed 70 pages.
 

29 Holograph Schema of Ulysses, [1922]
~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection
 (152K)  (175K)

Lloyd’s, London. Burglary Theft and Fire Policy for H. S. Weaver’s residence at 74 Gloucester Place, [London], W., signed and dated 23 March 1918, for one year: 14s 11d premium paid to insure £145 furniture, £70 clothing, £15 jewelry and £100 books. On verso, a holograph copy of the schema of Ulysses in Harriet Shaw Weaver’s hand in black ink prepared from a typescript copy sent by Joyce, signed “(copied by H. S. W.).”

Joyce produced two significantly different schemata of Ulysses, though they are often confused. He wrote out the first in mid-September 1920, the same month the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice lodged its complaint with the Court. It is in Italian, on two large sheets of inexpensive graph paper and was prepared for his Triestine friend and translator of Exiles, Carlo Linati, who he had asked to review Ulysses in The Little Review.15 It documents a crucial juncture in Joyce’s conception of Ulysses, when publication seemed unlikely and before a significant portion of the novel had actually been written. Like the later and better-known schema, it lists many of the structural features of the work; such as the titles, times, colors, Homeric associations, techniques, sciences/arts, organs and symbols of each chapter. But the “Linati schema” also contains another category that Joyce suppressed from the second schema: “senso (significato),” sense (meaning).16 In this category Joyce provided more specific clues about what he thought each chapter accomplished, clues he preferred to withhold once the finished work was to be made public.

In the midst of correcting page proofs for the last four chapters of the book, Joyce had another schema made, this time in English. This was to help Valery Larbaud prepare for his decisive public lecture on Ulysses, the “séance consacrée a James Joyce,” on Wednesday, 7 December 1921 at Adrienne Monnier’s La Maison des Amis des Livres, which was right across the street from Shakespeare and Company. No original holograph manuscript of the 1921 schemata has ever been documented. Nor is it known what copy of the schema Larbaud used, but at least six original typescript schemata survive. Each was pasted together horizontally from five typewritten sheets resembling a scroll. These schemata may have been made directly from notes, under Joyce’s not so vigilant supervision. They all have some different misspellings or mistypings and variations in layout. While these schemata lack the category “sense,” they contain an additional category, “scene,” which is absent from the Linati version. There are three copies at Buffalo (the copy Sylvia Beach tipped into her first edition of Ulysses, as well as another variant and a carbon); Stuart Gilbert’s copy is at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin; Herbert Gorman’s copy is part of the Croessmann Joyce Collection at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale;17 and the Auguste Morel-Richard Wallace copy is now in a private collection.

As news of the later schema began to circulate, other copies were made and given to friends and those who were working with Joyce, like George Antheil and Jacques Benoît-Mechin, for example. In June 2002, the National Library of Ireland, Dublin, acquired yet another copy. Although also typewritten, it is only on two large sheets of paper that are pasted together and it repeats some of the misspelling of the original schemata, indicating that it was made from one of them.18 Gorman prepared yet another copy of the schema for Edmund Wilson, which is tipped into his copy No. 610 of Ulysses (items 82 & 83). In the summer of 1928, Wilson wrote Joyce to ask permission to publish the schema in full in an essay he was preparing.19 Joyce flatly refused, as he would later when Bennett Cerf tried to include it in the 1934 Random House edition of Ulysses (item 100).
 

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Shakespeare & Company’s Subscription Form for Ulysses, [1921]
~ Cyril Connolly & Richard Ellmann Libraries

ULYSSES | by | JAMES JOYCE | will be published in | the Autumn of 1921 | by | [publisher’s device] | “SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY” | – SYLVIA BEACH – | 12, RUE DE L’ODÉON, PARIS – | VIe
(55.4M)

Contents: p. [1], title-page; p. [2], photograph of the author [Zürich 1919] pasted above Advance Press Notices; p. [3] advertisement of the three limitations and their prices; p. [4], perforated order form. One sheet, cream-white laid paper, 21.9 x 32.9 cm., folded in half vertically. 

Greatly underestimating the creative, printing and financial difficulties they would encounter, Joyce and Beach planned that Ulysses would appear in October 1921. Offering it to subscribers in three limitations, they hoped to acquire enough advance funds to cover the costs of printing the edition. As part of the advertising initiative, Joyce excerpted a number of brief review statements for the prospectus by well-known literati, including Aldington’s: “A most remarkable book… Bloom is a rags and tatters Hamlet, a proletarian Lear… An astonishing psychological document… ULYSSES is more bitter, more sordid, more ferociously satirical than anything Mr. Joyce has yet written… A tremendous libel on humanity which I, at least, am not clever enough to refute.” At least three versions of the prospectus were printed, the first two claim that Ulysses “will be published in the Autumn of 1921.” In between printing those forms, Shakespeare and Company moved from 8, rue Dupuytren to its now famous 12, rue de l’Odéon address. Beach did not state a publication date on the subsequent versions. The difference between the estimated 600 pages of Ulysses on the earlier version and the actual 732 pages listed in the third accounts for much of the delay. The last variant of the subscription form states that “Remittance [should be] by banker’s draft on Paris in Francs, trade discount 20%” and that the 150 Franc edition is “(sold out).” These are copies of the first and second versions (figure 9).
 

32 Ulysses, 2 February 1922

ULYSSES | by | JAMES JOYCE | SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY | 12, Rue de l’Odeon, 12 | PARIS | 1922
 

Contents: pp. [i–iv], blank, (pp. [i–ii] folded under wrapper); p. [v], half-title; p. [vi], BY THE SAME WRITER | [rule] | CHAMBER MUSIC | DUBLINERS | A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN | EXILES | [rule] | THE EGOIST PRESS | LONDON ; p. [vii], title-page; p. [viii], copyright statement: Tous droits de reproduction, de traduction | et d’adaptation réservés pour tous les pays y compris la Russie. | Copyright by James Joyce ; p. [ix], colophon: THIS EDITION IS LIMITED TO 1000 COPIES : | 100 COPIES (SIGNED) ON DUTCH | HANDMADE Paper NUMBERED FROM 1 TO 100 ; 150 COPIES ON VERGÉ | D’ARCHES NUBERED FROM 100 TO 250 ; | 750 COPIES ON HANDMADE PAPER NUMBERED FROM 251 TO 1000. | No [copy number stamped in black]; p. [x], blank; p. [xi], Publishers statement: The publisher asks the reader’s indulgence for typographical errors | unavoidable in the exceptional circumstances | S. B. ; p. [xii], blank; p. [1], divisional title: I; p. [2], blank; p. [3]–50, text; p. [51], divisional title: II; p. [52], blank; pp. [53]–565, text; p. [566], blank; p. [567], divisional title: III; p. [568], blank; pp. [569]–732, text; p. [733], printer’s statement: Printed | for | Sylvia Beach | by Maurice Darantiere | at | Dijon, France ; pp. [734–40], blank (pp. [739–40], folded under wrapper). Published: 2 February 1922; 1 of 17 out of series Press Copies [“Press Copy” stamped in blue-black ink on fly-title and title-page, and “UNNUMBERED PRESS COPY” stamped in blue-black ink on the colophon where the number would otherwise appear]; bound in white paper covers printed in blue on one side, 24 x 19 cm.; in reserve in white on front cover: ULYSSES | BY | JAMES JOYCE.

Joyce signed only a few books “Jim,” and only to the closest family members, including this Press Copy of the first edition of Ulysses that he inscribed: “To | Aunt Josephine | Jim | 2 March 1922 | Paris.” As Joyce composed his novel, he relied on his aunt to provide further logistical and descriptive details of life in the city from which he had exiled himself. Indeed, without the help of Josephine and other resident family and friends, Joyce might not have been able to claim that Dublin could be rebuilt from his rendering of it in Ulysses. This copy is printed on non-watermarked paper thinner than that of the 750 series.
 

33 Ulysses, 2 February 1922 ~ Cyril Connolly Library

ULYSSES | by | JAMES JOYCE | SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY |12, Rue de l’Odeon, 12 | PARIS | 1922
(79K)

Contents: pp. [i–iv], blank, (pp. [i–ii] folded under wrapper); p. [v], half-title; p. [vi], BY THE SAME WRITER | [rule] | CHAMBER MUSIC | DUBLINERS | A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN | EXILES | [rule] | THE EGOIST PRESS | LONDON ; p. [vii], title-page; p. [viii], copyright statement: Tous droits de reproduction, de traduction | et d’adaptation réservés pour tous les pays y compris la Russie. | Copyright by James Joyce ; p. [ix], colophon: THIS EDITION IS LIMITED TO 1000 COPIES : | 100 COPIES (SIGNED) ON DUTCH | HANDMADE Paper NUMBERED FROM 1 TO 100 ; 150 COPIES ON VERGÉ | D’ARCHES NUBERED FROM 100 TO 250 ; | 750 COPIES ON HANDMADE PAPER NUMBERED

FROM 251 TO 1000. | No [copy number stamped in black]; p. [x], blank; p. [xi], Publishers statement: The publisher asks the reader’s indulgence for typographical errors | unavoidable in the exceptional circumstances | S. B. ; p. [xii], blank; p. [1], divisional title: I; p. [2], blank; p. [3]–50, text; p. [51], divisional title: II; p. [52], blank; pp. [53]–565, text; p. [566], blank; p. [567], divisional title: III; p. [568], blank; pp. [569]–732, text; p. [733], printer’s statement: Printed | for | Sylvia Beach | by Maurice Darantiere | at | Dijon, France ; pp. [734–40], blank (pp. [739–40], folded under wrapper). Published: 2 February 1922; 1000 copies in three limitations: 1–100, 350 Francs; 101–250, 250 Francs; 251–750, 150 Francs; bound in white paper covers printed in blue on one side, 24.4 x 19.7 cm; in reserve in white on front cover: ULYSSES | BY | JAMES JOYCE ; printed on Dutch handmade paper, 23.5 x 19.5 cm., untrimmed, unopened.

This is copy No. 10 of 100 with the large format “Extracts from Press Notices” laid in (item 35; figure 10). Originally purchased by Paul Michel, this copy from Cyril Connolly’s library is exceptional: it is a pristine copy of Ulysses and best resembles what the volume Joyce later alluded to as “his usylessly unreadable Blue Book of Eccles” must have looked like in February 1922. The size, heft, and paper binding of the first edition made the book unwieldy and fragile: readers complained at the outset that the volume fell apart as they read it. But, printed in the French tradition, purchasers of this book were expected to have it individually rebound in cloth or leather to match other items in their library. Sylvia Beach, for example, had her own copy No. 2 bound in full blue morocco, in imitation of the wrapper, with silvered edges.
 

34 Ulysses, 12 October 1922 ~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection

ULYSSES | by | JAMES JOYCE | PUBLISHED FOR THE | EGOIST PRESS, LONDON | BY JOHN RODKER, PARIS | 1922
(81K)

Contents: pp. [i–iv], blank, (pp. [i–ii] folded under wrapper); p. [v], half-title; p. [vi], BY THE SAME WRITER | [rule] | CHAMBER MUSIC | DUBLINERS | A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN | EXILES | [rule] | THE EGOIST PRESS | LONDON ; p. [vii], title-page; p. [viii], copyright statement: Tous droits de reproduction, de traduction | et d’adaptation réservés pour tous les pays y compris la Russie. | Copyright by James Joyce ; p. [ix], colophon: THIS EDITION IS LIMITED TO | 2000 COPIES ON HANDMADE PAPER | NUMBERED FROM 1 TO 2000. | No [copy number stamped in black]; p. [x], First published by Shakespeare and Company, Paris : February 1922 | Published by the Egoist Press, London : October 1922 | p. [xi], publisher’s statement: The Publishers apologise for typographical | errors a list of which is appended. ; p. [xii], blank; p.[1], divisional title: I; p. [2], blank; p. [3]–50, text; p. [51], divisional title: II; p. [52], blank; pp. [53]–565, text; p. [566], blank; p. [567], divisional title: III; p. [568], blank; pp. [569]–732, text; p. [733], printer’s statement: Printed | BY | MAURICE DARANTIERE | AT | DIJON, FRANCE ; pp. [734–36], blank (pp. [735–36] folded under wrappers). Laid in at rear: pp. [1–7], ERRATA. Published: 12 October 1922; printed with plates for the first edition; 2000 copies: £2.2s; bound in white paper covers printed in blue on one side, 23 x 18.3 cm.; in reserve in white on front cover: ULYSSES | BY | JAMES JOYCE ; printed on white laid paper, 22.3 x 17.2 cm., untrimmed, unopened.

This is copy No. 2 of 2000 of the first English edition of Ulysses, which Joyce signed and inscribed to its publisher: “To | Harriet Weaver | in token of gratitude | James Joyce | Dijon | 12 October 1922.” It retains the laid in Errata sheet and is accompanied by an Egoist publication announcement. The United States Customs authorities confiscated–but evidently did not destroy– approximately 400 to 500 copies of this first Egoist Press edition. In collaboration with John Rodker, Weaver had the English edition re-printed in Paris in January 1923. The English customs authorities in turn seized this second printing of the English edition at Folkestone. Although most of these copies were destroyed (though not as many as the 499 out of 500 as has often been claimed).
 

35 “Extracts of Press Notices of Ulysses,” [1922]

EXTRACTS from PRESS NOTICES | –– OF –– | ULYSSES  | By JAMES JOYCE | [decorative rule].
(29.3M)

Contents: pp. [1–4], text [47 press reviews]. One sheet pink paper, 30 x 28.8 cm., folded in half; printed by Leveridge & Co., Harlesden. N.W.

Joyce collected, read, and sent on clippings to his agents, to potential reviewers and colleagues, and to his previous, current, and prospective publishers. He, Beach and Weaver reproduced extracts of press reviews in order to promote his works. These leaflets show that a review did not have to be complimentary for Joyce to consider it valuable. In fact, Joyce found the array of opinions on such leaflets useful and “amusingly contradictory.”20 The leaflets printed to advertise Ulysses included extracts from both the most laudatory and the most rancorous reviews. The Irish critic Shane Leslie was perhaps the most vocally vehement critic of Ulysses, nonetheless, Joyce included passages from two of his reviews in the extracts. In the first, from the prestigious Quarterly Review, Leslie declared: “As a whole the book must remain impossible to read and undesirable to quote…. An assault upon Divine Decency as well as on human intelligence…literary Bolshevism…experimental, anti-conventional, anti-Christian, chaotic, totally unmoral….” In the second, from the Dublin Review and signed “Domini Canis,” Leslie claimed: “We are prepared to do justice to the power of litheness of the style, when intelligible, to the occasional beauty of the paragraph, and to the adventurous headlong experiments in new literary form, but as a whole we regard it as the screed of one possessed.” This copy of press notices of Ulysses was laid in Joyce’s Aunt Josephine Murray’s “Press Copy” of the first edition (item 32).
 

36 Alessandro Francini Bruni, Joyce Intimo Spogliato In Piazza, 1922
~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection

ALESSANDRO FRANCINI BRUNI | [rule] | JOYCE INTIMO | SPOGLIATO IN PIAZZA | (Un’ indiavolata caricatura dello scrittore irlandese) | [double rule] | Detta, sotto gli auspici dell’Asso- | ciazione della stampa della Venezia | Giulia, nella Sala della Società | Filarmonico-Drammatica, la sera | °°°del 22 febbraio 1922.°°° | [ornament] | TRIESTE | „LA EDITORIALE LIBRARIA“ | 1922. 44 pp.
 (53K)  (29K)

Less than three weeks after the publication of Ulysses in Paris, Stanislaus Joyce and some of Joyce’s friends gathered in the Dramatic Society’s Hall in Trieste to hear what they expected would be the amicable recollections of one of Joyce’s closest friends and colleagues, Allesandro Francini Bruni. Their friendship began in Pola in 1904 and Francini Bruni was Joyce’s fellow teacher at the Berlitz school; the two families had even lived together on and off during the sixteen years of their friendship. What was revealed of Joyce in the lecture, “Joyce Stripped Naked in the Piazza: A Devilish Caricature of the Irish Writer,” probably did not surprise those who knew Joyce well during those years. Nonetheless, now that Joyce was an internationally recognized author, this was not the image of the great artist Joyce wanted to promote. The caricature of the man and the artist began: “What characters these Irish are! Oscar Wilde, Bernard Shaw […], but the elusive personality of James Joyce surpasses them all.”21 Fortunately, given its limited availability the lecture was a purely local event. Joyce sent Weaver his own copy, which was signed “A J. Joyce fraternamente | Francini Bruni Alessandro | Trieste 22.2.22.”
 

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Playboy, 1923 ~ Harriet Shaw Weaver Collection

Playboy: A Portfolio of Art & Satire, New York (January 1919–June 1924). “The Day of the Rabblement: How James Joyce Broke with the Irish Renaissance,” (First Quarter, 1923) Vol. 2: No. 1, p. 41. [Slocum & Cahoon C60]
(111K)

No recent work by Joyce had been published in the United States since 1919 when The Little Review was forced to stop serializing Ulysses. But in December 1923, The New York Tribune reproduced “The Day of the Rabblement” from Mary Colum’s own copy of Two Essays. A few months later, the original Playboy: A Portfolio of Art & Satire reprinted it yet again. Playboy featured a wide array of new writers and artists and was edited, published and printed by Egmont Arens, the package and industrial designer. He also ran the famous Washington Square Bookshop and later edited Vanity Fair. This particular issue was specially edited by Edmund Wilson. The other copy of Playboy is part of the general holdings of McFarlin Library, Special Collections.
 


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